River of Life

Denesa’s Experience Photographing This Moment

I’m driving from East to West across the South side of Hawaii Island when three horses catch my view.

Pulling over, I stay with and photograph them. Getting the cue from them, I gently approach to sit under what I later learn is a Breadfruit tree. The song of its branches and broad, vibrant leaves serenade us as patterns of lush veins flow like rivers with life-giving water and nutrients. Under the shade, with the horses in a timeless moment, I find myself at peace, at ease, at home.

Photographed at Hawaii Island, USA in September 2016
Total Quantity in Edition: 111
Quantity Available via the website: 100
Clear
Size Prints Available
  • 8″X12″ / 0.2×0.3M $888
  • 16″X24″ / 0.4×0.6M $1,333
  • 24″X36″ / 0.6×0.9M $2,555
  • 32″X48″ / 0.8×1.2M $3,333
  • 48″X72″ / 1.2×1.8M $5,555
  • 72″X108″ (in three panels of 72″x36″) 1.8×2.7M (in three panels of 1.8×0.9m) $11,555
  • 96″X144″ (in three panels of 48″x96″) / 2.4×3.6M (in three panels of 1.2×2.4m) $17,777

More Information

Ecosystem Information

The Breadfruit tree (‘Ulu in Hawai’ian) was a large part of the cultural and spiritual life of ancient Hawaiians and was one of the “canoe plants” brought by early Polynesian settlers to the Hawaiian islands centuries ago. They were an essential source of food, wood and craft materials for making canoes, homes and clothing and were also used as medicine. They can grow to 85 feet (26 meters) and are one of the highest-yielding food plants. They also produce a latex sap that can be used to seal canoes and homes. You can still use Breadfruit today as a rich source of nutrients, a gluten-free flour, insect repellant, chewing gum and as fabric without harming the tree.

There are many traditional spiritual chants, stories and legends about breadfruit. One famous legend tells of the god Ku who fell in love with a human woman. They married and raised a family together. When famine struck the island, he transformed his body into an ‘ulu tree to feed his mortal beloveds.

Environmental Organization Benefiting

Hawaii Pacific Parks

How You’re Helping

Congratulations and thank you (mahalo in Hawai’ian)! By bringing this print inside you’re protecting the natural and cultural heritage of Hawaii through its parks. You’re supporting educational programs, cultural activities, park interpretation, research and publications to help ensure that the rich cultural and natural diversity can thrive for present and future generations. Thank you for helping the plants that help us every day. You’re a bright light!

 

Medium

Dye-Infused Recycled Aircraft Aluminum with accompanying certificate of authenticity made of solar-etched reclaimed wood and eco-friendly paper using soy-based inks.

Trees planted per print (from smallest sized print to largest sized print)

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Trees planted per edition

111-777, depending on which size prints are collected

is an award-winning carbon-neutral nature photographer from California.

She risks her life traveling to the most exquisite, remote locations on the globe to bring the majesty of nature’s essence into the homes of heart-centered art-lovers all over the world. She donates 50% of proceeds to projects doing tangible, meaningful good for the ecosystems and/or species in each print. Each eco-luxuriously hand-crafted, limited-edition wall-sized photograph is made from recycled materials and protects the ecosystem in the picture, helping it to thrive and continue to inspire the deepest parts of our being.

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